Untitled Document

Hi folks. Today has been a rough one for me as my family lost our beloved dog Maddie. I don't mean to use this space to unload my emotional baggage, but tracking airplay was not foremost on my mind. At the same time it was good to have the routine to fall into and at least try to keep my thoughts off of the sadness. Everyone reading this, if you have a pet, give them an extra big hug today.

With that said, let's take a quick look at our charts for the week. It's all about The xx's new record, I See You, at #1 with a ton more play than its closest competition, and single "Say Something Loving" at #4. That closest competitor to The xx was Rubblebucket's new If U C My Enemies EP, the title track from which took the top spot on the singles chart. Last week The Shins were #1 on both charts; this week "Name For You" slips to #2, with the forthcoming album Heartworms at #3.

The top five albums close out with a three way tie (actually making it the top six) between The Flaming Lips' Oczy Mlody (it's Polish for 'Eyes of The Young'), The Georgia Flood's People Like Ourselves, and The Molochs' America's Velvet Glory. Filling in the top five singles are Temples with "Strange or Be Forgotten" at #3 and Declan McKenna with "The Kids Don't Wanna Come Home" at #5. Check out the rest of the top 10 albums and singles on the charts below or see the full charts at FMQB.com/SubModern. If you missed it last week, our interview and SubModern Session with Sløtface from Norway is still available there as well. Til next time, take care and treasure your four legged family.

~ Josh Landow
Twitter: @JoshTLandow

Updated 1/18/17
# Artist Track Label
1 RUBBLEBUCKET IF U C MY ENEMIES YEBO
2 THE SHINS NAME FOR YOU COLUMBIA
3 TEMPLES STRANGE OR BE FORGOTTEN FAT POSSUM
4 THE XX SAY SOMETHING LOVING YOUNG TURKS
5 DECLAN MCKENNA THE KIDS DON'T WANNA COME HOME COLUMBIA
6 RYAN ADAMS DO YOU STILL LOVE ME? PAX AM / BLUE NOTE
7 KEVIN DEVINE DAYDRUNK PROCRASTINATE! MUSIC TRAITORS
8t MEGAFAUNA DOUBT SELF-RELEASED
  TEN FE TWIST YOUR ARM SOME KINDA LOVE / PIAS
10t THE GEORGIA FLOOD TELL ME WHAT YOU WANT HUBBUB!
  THE MOLOCHS NO MORE CRYIN' INNOVATIVE LEISURE
  THE ORWELLS THEY PUT A BODY IN THE BAYOU CANVASBACK / ATLANTIC
13t BLAENAVON ORTHODOX MAN CANVASBACK
  ELECTRIC GUEST BACK FOR ME DOWNTOWN
  HAMILTON LEITHAUSER + ROSTAM IN A BLACKOUT GLASSNOTE
  PORTUGAL. THE MAN NOISE POLLUTION ATLANTIC
17t BLAIR CRIMMINS AND THE HOOKERS TOP OF THE CLASS SELF-RELEASED
  CAGE THE ELEPHANT COLD COLD COLD RCA
  CHELSEA SHAG NEW PERFUME PROTOCAL
  GLASS ANIMALS PORK SODA HARVEST
  JUSTICE FIRE BECAUSE
  SALLIE FORD GET OUT VANGUARD / CONCORD
  SINKANE TELEPHONE CITY SLANG
  SLOWDIVE STAR ROVING DEAD OCEANS
  SURFER BLOOD MATTER OF TIME JOYFUL NOISE
 
Updated 1/18/17
# Artist Album Label
1 THE XX I SEE YOU YOUNG TURKS
2 RUBBLEBUCKET IF U C MY ENEMIES YEBO
3 THE SHINS HEARTWORMS COLUMBIA
4t THE FLAMING LIPS OCZY MLODY WARNER BROS.
  THE GEORGIA FLOOD PEOPLE LIKE OURSELVES HUBBUB!
  THE MOLOCHS AMERICA'S VELVET GLORY INNOVATIVE LEISURE
7t THE REGRETTES FEEL YOUR FEELINGS FOOL! WARNER BROS.
  RUN THE JEWELS RUN THE JEWELS 3 SELF-RELEASED
9t JUSTICE WOMAN BECAUSE
  MEGAFAUNA WELCOME HOME SELF-RELEASED
  RYAN ADAMS PRISONER BLUE NOTE
12 KEVIN DEVINE INSTIGATOR PROCRASTINATE! MUSIC TRAITORS
13t ELECTRIC GUEST PLURAL DOWNTOWN
  FOXYGEN HANG JAGJAGUWAR
  KYLE ANDREWS ESCAPE ELEPHANT LADY
  THE ORWELLS TERRIBLE HUMAN BEINGS CANVASBACK / ATLANTIC
17 SUNDARA KARMA YOUTH IS ONLY EVER FUN IN RETROSPECT BEE & EL / RAL / RED
18t CHERRY GLAZERR APOCALIPSTICK SECRETLY CANADIAN
  JAPANDROIDS NEAR TO THE WILD HEART OF LIFE ANTI-
20 LEOPOLD & HIS FICTION DARLING DESTROYER NATIVE FICTION / ILA
21t HARD PROOF STINGER MODERN OUTSIDER
  OTHERKIN CAN YOU FEEL IT EP RUBYWORKS
  SLOTHRUST EVERYONE ELSE DANGERBIRD
  SOHN RENNEN 4AD
25t A TRIBE CALLED QUEST WE GOT IT FROM HERE... THANK YOU 4 YOUR SERVICE EPIC
  BASTILLE WILD WORLD VIRGIN
  CROCODILES DREAMLESS ZOO
  KALEO A/B ELEKTRA
  KINGS OF LEON WALLS RCA
  STRFKR BEING NO ONE, GOING NOWHERE POLYVINYL

Sløtface
Empire Records EP
(Propeller)

In 2016 Norwegian punk band Sløtface released two great EPs, Sponge State and Empire Records.  They recently embarked on their first tour of The United States and I had the chance to sit down with band members Haley Shea (vocals), Tor-Arne Vikingstad (guitar), Halvard Skeie Wiencke (drums), and Lasse Lokøy (bass) to chat about their formation, their name, their country’s politics, and what’s to come from them next.  I was also treated to an acoustic performance from Haley and Tor, which I’m pleased to share with you as our first SubModern Session of 2017.

FMQB: This is your very first tour of The United States?

Tor-Arne Vikingstad: Yeah, we’re playing our third U.S. concert ever tonight.
 
FMQB: Well, welcome on behalf of the American people.

Haley Shea: After we finished in D.C. last night, we saw the Capitol, the White House, and the Lincoln Memorial, so we’re feeling like we experienced some American things.

FMQB: And good to see all that stuff now before…

HS: Yeaaaaah… We’re trying not to mention that to people, uh… We’re trying not to rub it in that we’re from a social democracy that’s kinda doing ok compared to everybody else.
 
TAV: Our country is basically Bernie Sanders all the way I think.
 
HS: On this tour we’ve had a bunch of people ask, “Can we come back with you guys?  Can you stick us in your suitcase when you leave again?”

TAV: We were talking politics with someone, I don’t remember with who, and I was like “y’know, we’re socialists, so…” and he was dead quiet.  Is that a curse word here?
 
FMQB: To some people probably.  But let’s not talk politics, let’s talk music, and let’s talk about how Sløtface got together.  I know you’re all pretty young and the band formed when you were in high school?
 
TAV: That’s true.  You guys were 15 or 16?
 
Lasse Lokøy: Yeah, Halvard and me were 15 and 16 and you guys were 17 and 19. 

TAV: There was a cool music environment for young people.

LL: There were many youth clubs where you could go and get in touch with people to form bands.  So all of us were playing in different bands.  And then Haley had written some songs.

HS: Tor-Arne and I started working on a few of them because we’d been in a band that we didn’t really want to be in anymore, so we thought we’d start something different.  Then we kind of picked the people who we thought were the most fun to play with and the most reliable that would actually show up to band practice and try to actually play some shows and record some things, because we’d been in bands for years before we’d ever recorded anything or done very much.  We wanted to do something that took it a little more seriously.

FMQB: When you say you’d been in bands for years, cause you were 16 or 17, did you start playing in bands when you were like 12 years old?

HS: Yeah, I was in my first band when I was 11.

LL: When I was 15, I was in four different bands!

Halvard Skeie Wiencke: I think I was 13 when I was in my first band.

FMQB: With this being the band where you wanted to be more serious, is that why your songs are in English?

HS: I write the lyrics for our songs and I was born in the States, but I’ve lived in Norway since I was 4.  I write lyrics kind of in diary form so it made sense to sing in the same language that I wrote my diary in, because it was like my mother tongue.  Plus, I guess it makes sense for all of us to write music in the same language that a lot of the music we listen to is in, cause we really are mostly inspired by British and American music.  I guess it kind of fit.

TAV: And all the TV shows and movies we watch are all in English.

HS: And I just saw on the internet that Norway is one of the countries that has English as a second language that’s best in English, because you start learning English when you’re 6.  So, it’s not like people aren’t fluent and can understand it, so that’s not a problem.  And then you can reach a wider audience, which is a benefit.

FMQB: And also because of reaching beyond your borders, that’s what you changed the spelling of your name [from Slutface to Sløtface]? I thought that it was supposed to be pronounced as “slot face.”
 
HS: Yeah, we like to mess with you Americans.

LL: We didn’t really change the name, we just changed the writing.  We have a bigger alphabet than you.  We have Æ, Ø, and Å at the end.

HS: The Ø is pronounced “EU”.

FMQB: You were actually getting censored online in some places?

TAV: Yeah, there were problems with festivals that couldn’t book us because they couldn’t promote us.

HS: It’s mostly online that all of the algorithms pick up on the word “slut” and then you’re blocked from everything because that word is in it.  So we figured by changing one letter, we would avoid those algorithms and the robots wouldn’t be able to tell, and that’s worked out so far.  We also like that it connects us to Norway, because people are always trying to be like “You don’t play very Norwegian music.”  

LL:  And then you have Twenty Øne Piløts that uses the Ø as an O.  Which is not cool!

HSW: Someone called us a Twenty One Pilots rip off and we were like, “No, it’s our letter! They’re ripping off us!”

FMQB: You played today a couple songs from the Empire Records EP and one from the Sponge State EP.  You put both out in one year, but since they were separated, what’s the distinction between the two?

HS: Well, mostly we chose to put them out that way because releasing a full length album is such a huge deal that we wanted to be really sure that we had the perfect album for us.  So we recorded both of these EPs last year and then we’ve spent a long time after working on our debut album that‘ll be out next year [2017] sometime.  Also, thematically it worked out well because the Sponge State EP is kind of like our opening statement to people.  We wanted that to be our manifesto for all of the issues regarding youth culture and feminism that we like to write about and talk about.  Then the second EP was kind of to show that, yes, we’re a feminist band, but being a feminist in 2016 means a lot of different things and we can’t necessarily be classified as a feminist punk band, which is how a lot of people like to classify us.  So we wanted to showcase a lot of different sides of ourselves in our songwriting.  It doesn’t always have to be explicitly like “This is what we think and this is why you’re wrong,” which is what a lot of the first songs are about.

TAV: Yeah, it was really fun to release “Take Me Dancing” and songs like that and see how people reacted.

LL: I feel like a lot of people see feminists as just protesting and always keeping their fists up, but there’s always different sides of things.   You’re not just one way.  You can be a feminist and have fun and wanna get drunk and party and stuff.

Listen to Sløtface’s acoustic SubModern Session performance here.  Find out more about them and see videos at Sløtface.no.

By Josh T. Landow


 
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